Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Navigation

ELit Book Tip: Sasha Marianna Salzmann, Außer sich

I am in love. Firstly, I’m in love with Alia, then with Uncle Cemal and later with Anton; I’m in love with Istanbul anyway, and I’m in love with Sasha Marianna Salzmann’s language – with individual sentences, and I’m in love with everyone plus everything that, taken together, results in more than a story. I’m not somebody who falls in love quickly...

I am in love. Firstly, I’m in love with Alia, then with Uncle Cemal and later with Anton; I’m in love with Istanbul anyway, and I’m in love with Sasha Marianna Salzmann’s language – with individual sentences, and I’m in love with everyone plus everything that, taken together, results in more than a story. I’m not somebody who falls in love quickly. My job also calls for me to be a critical reader. Yet, you can only read this novel with a pounding heart.         

You don’t know exactly where to begin an account of Sasha Marianna Salzmann’s debut novel – you’re uncertain about which story, which country or which family branch. Perhaps, this is exactly the question that the writer poses in the whirlpool of her stories: where we begin, and how we become who we are, while we desperately seek not to become what our parents and grandparents once were. We exist, but we exist because, – and ‘because’ is writ large and much larger than sometimes we want to believe. ‘Because’ constitutes our ancestors, our families who lived, suffered, loved, argued, feared, laughed and had feelings. ‘Because’ is the thing that we process every day; either we permanently confront it or we try to distance ourselves from it. Yet, we fail to achieve a balance, simply: ‘because’.

Ali and Anton, the twins who fall rather than stand at the centre of this novel, arrive in Germany from the Soviet Union as children along with their half-Jewish family. Incidentally, the writer also did so. This is only worth mentioning because she so fluently and self-confidently weaves insights about this country into her novel – the real place, and the place that consists of ideas and suggestions. They arrive as children and grow up in a broken family, in dysfunctional circumstances, and personally broken, for even as children in the playground they are bullied by other children. One day, the breakdown is so great that Anton disappears and only sends an empty postcard from Istanbul. (The reader doesn’t know why exactly this happens, now when things have never seemed so good.) So, Ali sets off to search for her brother in this pulsating, dazzling metropolis where she only knows one person: Uncle Cemal, the uncle of her flat mate. The novel begins here. But the unique thing about this story is that it could easily end here as well. Otherwise, this could be the middle, as Ali lies on the bedbug-infested sofa at Uncle Cemal’s and Cay drinks; as they aimlessly walk through the streets; how she meets Katho and maybe falls in love with him/her and maybe not. This can all be immensely significant, or only a fleeting moment to confirm how life passes.

While Ali roams the filthy, noisy streets of Istanbul, which are bursting with life, her thoughts and memories – that cannot be such, for she never experienced any of this – scroll through stories of her family, parents, grandparents and great-grandparents. Who met whom and how; why did they fall in love and mostly not in love; and how they survived the war and life. You could complain that in one of these stories something must happen to the protagonist, so that he remembers his roots, and somebody who delves into his past to find himself today. Maybe, and maybe not. Sasha Marianna Salzmann has the gift of conjuring up worlds that are plausible in their own right: Ali’s life in Berlin and her non-life in Istanbul; the twins in the Soviet Union, their parents on the outskirts of Moscow, Katho in the Ukraine and so on, so that you forget these stories are part of something. You are so immersed in the places, decades and feelings that it appears as if Sasha Marianna Salzmann were gifting the reader several books rolled into one: each time that the novel switches between the different family branches, at the pit of your stomach there is this faint, yet wonderful disappointment of a great reading experience: what – already over?

The author address important societal questions with a naturalness so that you can only find the intricate debates about them ridiculous. Ali is a girl, Anton is a boy – that’s how it begins. The two characters are pushed into the world and when the novel ends – the novel, though not its story – Ali is possibly a man. This is another strength of the novel: you can ‘let be’ such ‘perhaps’ and ‘maybe’ episodes.

Sasha Marianna Salzmann’s language is like a whirlpool – she lines up sentences and sub-clauses together, yet without ever losing her breath. Perhaps this is because she gives every detail, every feeling its space, its image and its own description: nothing about this novel is spit out, nothing is forced; this is an art that only a few authors can master. (But as mentioned, I’m also in love … .) On the other hand, she grasps some things so clearly and directly in words that it is painful for a while. For example, when Ali’s mother asks her disgusted daughter whom she finally sees again after months, what they should talk about, and Ali doesn’t answer, but reflects: “About the need for human closeness and what you should do with it. About discoloured teeth because of cigarettes and black tea; about why you still haven’t moved out of this museum here; do you need this dreariness, instead of buying new furniture and putting it over old burn holes; burn everything and give away my clothes to the Red Cross; move to a different city; move in with me – no, please don’t move in with me, but don’t move too far away either; search for your son with me, but don’t talk about it.”

Sasha Marianna Salzmann has written a novel that is like its title: “Außer sich” (“beside itself”). The language drives the reader, as though breathless; the author strings together sentences, themes, stories, people, centuries, as though they were ‘beside themselves’. She jumps in and retreats again – into feelings, thought chains as well as the big questions, but she keeps the necessary distance to it all that she needs to avoid clichés or pity. Simply, ‘beside itself’.

Translated by Suzanne Kirkbright

***

Ich bin verliebt. Erst bin ich in Ali verliebt, dann in Onkel Cemal, später in Anton, in Istanbul sowieso, ich bin in die Sprache von Sasha Marianna Salzmann verliebt, und in einzelne Sätze, ich bin in jeden für sich und all das verliebt, was zusammen mehr ergibt als eine Geschichte. Ich bin niemand, der sich schnell verliebt, und von Berufswegen ein kritischer Leser, aber nur so lässt sich dieser Roman lesen: Mit klopfendem Herzen.   

Dass man nicht weiß, wo man beginnt, den Debütoman von Sasha Marianna Salzmann zu erzählen, bei welcher Geschichte, in welchem Land, bei welchem Familienzweig, ist vielleicht genau die Frage, die die Autorin in ihrem Geschichtensog stellt: Wo beginnen wir, und wie werden wir, die wir sind, während wir verzweifelt versuchen, nicht das zu werden, was unsere Eltern und Großeltern einmal waren. Wir sind, aber wir sind weil, und das Weil ist groß, es ist größer, als wir das manchmal wahrhaben wollen. Das Weil sind unsere Vorfahren, unsere Familien, die gelebt, gelitten, geliebt, gezankt, gefürchtet, gelacht, gefühlt haben. Das Weil ist, woran wir uns tagtäglich abarbeiten, indem wir uns entweder damit permanent auseinander setzen oder uns davon zu distanzieren versuchen, und die Mitte dazwischen nicht treffen, eben: Weil.

Ali und Anton, die Zwillinge, die im Zentrum dieses Romans mehr fallen als stehen, kommen als Kinder mit ihrer halbjüdischen Familie aus der Sowjetunion nach Deutschland, so wie es auch die Autorin tut, was nur deshalb erwähnenswert ist, weil sie das Wissen um dieses Land, das tatsächliche, und jenes, das aus Ahnungen und Andeutungen besteht, so virtuos und selbstbewusst in ihren Roman einflechtet. Sie kommen als Kinder, und sie werden groß, in einer zerrütteten Familie, in zerrütteten Verhältnissen, zerrüttet selbst, da sind sie noch Kinder auf dem Schulhof, die von anderen Kindern gemobbt werden. Eines Tages ist die Zerrüttung so groß, dass Anton verschwindet - warum genau jetzt, wo die Dinge doch niemals gut gewesen zu sein scheinen, erfährt man nicht - und nur einmal eine leere Postkarte aus Istanbul schickt. Also macht sich Ali auf den Weg, ihren Bruder zu suchen, in dieser pulsierenden, glitzernden Millionenstadt, in der sie nur einen kennt: Onkel Cemal, den Onkel ihres Mitbewohners. Hier beginnt der Roman, aber das ist das Besondere an dieser Geschichte: Er könnte genauso gut hier enden. Oder das könnte die Mitte sein, wie Ali bei Onkel Cemal auf dem wanzenverseuchten Sofa liegt und Cay trinkt, wie sie ziellos durch die Straßen streift, wie sie Katho begegnet, in den/die sie sich vielleicht verliebt und vielleicht auch nicht. All das kann von großer Bedeutung sein, oder ein kurzer Augenblick, der vom Vergehen des Lebens zeugt.

Während Ali durch die dreckigen, lärmenden, vor Leben strotzenden Straßen Istanbuls streift, streifen ihre Gedanken und Erinnerungen, die keine sein können, weil sie das alles nicht mit erlebt haben, durch die Geschichten ihrer Familie, ihrer Eltern, ihrer Großeltern, Urgroßeltern. Wer hat wie wen getroffen, warum geliebt und meistens nicht geliebt, wie den Krieg, das Leben überlebt. Eine dieser Geschichten, könne man nörgeln, in der dem Protagonisten etwas zustoßen muss, damit er sich an seine Wurzeln erinnert, noch jemand, der in seine Vergangenheit reist, um sich selbst im Heute zu finden. Vielleicht, vielleicht auch nicht. Sasha Marianna Salzmann hat die Gabe, Welten zu erschaffen, die für sich stehen: Alis Leben in Berlin, ihr Nicht-Leben in Istanbul, die Zwillinge in der Sowjetunion, ihre Eltern am Rande von Moskau, Katho in der Ukraine und so weiter, dass man vergisst, dass die Geschichten Teil sind von etwas. So sehr taucht man in Orte, Jahrzehnte, Gefühle ein, dass es ist, als würde Sasha Marianna Salzmann einem mehrere Bücher in einem schenken: Jedes Mal, wenn der Roman zwischen den Familienzweigen springt, ist da diese kleine, aber wundervolle Enttäuschung eines großen Leseerlebnisses im Bauch: Was, schon vorbei?

Wichtige gesellschaftliche Fragen wirft die Autorin mit einer Selbstverständlichkeit auf, dass man die umständlich geführten Debatten darüber nur noch lächerlich finden kann. Ali ist ein Mädchen, Anton ist ein Junge, so beginnt es, als die beiden auf die Welt gepresst werden, aber als der Roman endet, der Roman, nicht seine Geschichte, ist Ali ein Mann, vielleicht. Auch das ist eine Stärke des Romans, dass alle Vielleichts als solche stehen gelassen werden dürfen.

Sasha Marianna Salzmanns Sprache ist wie ein Sog, sie reiht Sätze, und Nebensätze und angehängte Satzfetzen aneinander, ohne außer Atem zu kommen. Das liegt vielleicht daran, dass sie jedem Detail, jedem Gefühl ihren Raum, ihr Bild, ihre eigene Beschreibung gibt: Nichts an diesem Roman ist dahin gerotzt, und nichts angestrengt, das ist eine Kunst, die nur wenige beherrschen. (Aber wie gesagt, ich bin ja auch verliebt.) Manches wiederum fasst sie so deutlich und schleifenlos in Worte, dass es kurz schmerzt. Zum Beispiel, wenn Alis Mutter die angewiderte Tochter, die sie nach Monaten endlich zu Gesicht bekommt, fragt, worüber sie reden sollen, und Ali nicht antwortet, aber denkt: „Über das Bedürfnis nach menschlicher Nähe und wohin man damit soll. Über das Verfärben von Zähnen durch Zigaretten und schwarzen Tee, darüber, warum du noch nicht ausgezogen bist aus diesem Museum hier, brauchst du das, diesen Mief, statt neue Möbel zu kaufen und über alte Brandlöcher zu stellen, alles verbrennen, die Klamotten verschenken, von mir aus ans Rote Kreuz, in eine andere Stadt ziehen, zu mir ziehen, nein, bitte nicht zu mir ziehen, aber auch nicht weit weg, mit mir deinen Sohn suchen, aber nicht darüber sprechen.“

Sasha Marianna Salzmann hat einen Roman geschrieben, der so ist wie sein Titel: "Außer sich". Die Sprache treibt den Leser wie außer Atem, die Autorin hängt Sätze, Themen, Geschichten, Menschen, Jahrhunderte aneinander, als sei sie außer sich, sie springt hinein und tritt wieder heraus, in Gefühle, Gedankenschlangen und die ganz großen Fragen, aber sie bewahrt die notwendige Distanz zu all dem, die sie braucht, um Klischees oder Mitleid zu meiden, genau so: Außer sich.

 Sasha Marianna Salzmann
Außer sich. Roman
Berlin : Suhrkamp, 2017

Lena Gorelik

Lena Gorelik is a German writer. She was born in 1981 in St. Petersburg. In 1992 she came to Germany with her Russian-Jewish family as a “Kontingentfluchtling” (quota refugee).

Lena Gorelik ist eine deutsche Schriftstellerin. Geboren wurde sie 1981 in Petersburg und kam 1992 mit ihrer russisch-jüdischen Familie als Kontingentflüchtling nach Deutschland.

Participant of the European Literature Days 2015. 
Teilnehmerin der Europäischen Literaturtage 2015.

Lena Gorelik is a German writer. She was born in 1981 in St. Petersburg. In 1992 she came to Germany with her Russian-Jewish family as a “Kontingentfluchtling” (quota refugee).

Lena Gorelik ist eine deutsche Schriftstellerin. Geboren wurde sie 1981 in Petersburg und kam 1992 mit ihrer russisch-jüdischen Familie als Kontingentflüchtling nach Deutschland.

Participant of the European Literature Days 2015.
Teilnehmerin der Europäischen Literaturtage 2015.

All entries by Lena Gorelik
Thursday Th 30 30 November Nov 11 11 17 2017 November Nov 11 11 Thursday Th 30 30 17 2017 9 09 9 09 20 h AM