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Najem Wali

Najem Wali is an Iraqi novelist and journalist, based in Germany. Najem Wali ist ein irakischer Romanautor und Journalist, er lebt in Deutschland. Participant of the European Literature Days 2015. Teilnehmer der Europäischen Literaturtage 2015.

Najem Wali is an Iraqi novelist and journalist, based in Germany.

Najem Wali ist ein irakischer Romanautor und Journalist, er lebt in Deutschland.

Participant of the European Literature Days 2015. 
Teilnehmer der Europäischen Literaturtage 2015.
(c) Jürgen Bauer

Biography

Najem Wali is an Iraqi novelist and journalist, based in Germany.

Najem Wali ist ein irakischer Romanautor und Journalist, er lebt in Deutschland.

Participant of the European Literature Days 2015.
Teilnehmer der Europäischen Literaturtage 2015.

Blog Posts

Exile and the burden of home on us/ Das Exil und die Last der Heimat auf uns/ المنفى ووطأة الأوطان فينا نجم والي

It is right, of course, that many writers and artists are ‘geographically’ in exile. Yet in my view, back ‘home’ they had already gone into inner exile since they became aware of the pain in the country where they were born and lived, or better still let’s say: since they felt a constant ache in their mind and soul because of the experience of the state’s injustice to the people; since they also strictly rejected the social tyranny accompanying the terror of the state’s force and the latter being used as a justification for destroying everything that is beautiful.

An Attempt to Define Exile/ Ein Versuch, das Exil zu definieren/ محاولة في تعريف المنفى نجم والي

Often, writers in exile are faced with the question why they left their country and whether ultimately this wouldn’t lead to a loss of their memories, to their forgetting those private and cherished places where they’ve lived for years. Do their works not then lose the warmth and familiarity of those who were still living in the country, and do their opinions not lose the same measure of authenticity? Often, writers in exile are faced with the question why they left their country and whether ultimately this wouldn’t lead to a loss of their memories, to their forgetting those private and cherished places where they’ve lived for years. Do their works not then lose the warmth and familiarity of those who were still living in the country, and do their opinions not lose the same measure of authenticity?