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Elif Shafak

b. 1971, is a Turkish writer. Born in Strasbourg as the daughter of Turkish parents, she spent her childhood and youth in Spain; she studied political science at Middle East Technical University and now lives in London. She is among the most popular female authors in Turkey. Her books have been translated into more than 40 languages. Winner of the Austrian Book Trade Prize. “For the Spiegel, Elif Shafak is the ‘emotional voice of a divided nation’, for the NZZ she is the ‘foremost feminine voice of Turkish contemporary literature’. In The Independent the author was called ‘the voice of Turkish literature’, and in The New York Times she is known as the ‘most prominent feminist literary voice of Turkey’.”

b. 1971, is a Turkish writer. Born in Strasbourg as the daughter of Turkish parents, she spent her childhood and youth in Spain; she studied political science at Middle East Technical University  and now lives in London. She is among the most popular female authors in Turkey. Her books have been translated into more than 40 languages. Winner of the Austrian Book Trade Prize.
“For the Spiegel, Elif Shafak is the ‘emotional voice of a divided nation’, for the NZZ she is the ‘foremost feminine voice of Turkish contemporary literature’. In The Independent the author was called ‘the voice of Turkish literature’, and in The New York Times she is known as the ‘most prominent feminist literary voice of Turkey’.”
(c) Fethi Karaduma

Biography

b. 1971, is a Turkish writer. Born in Strasbourg as the daughter of Turkish parents, she spent her childhood and youth in Spain; she studied political science at Middle East Technical University and now lives in London. She is among the most popular female authors in Turkey. Her books have been translated into more than 40 languages. Winner of the Austrian Book Trade Prize.
“For the Spiegel, Elif Shafak is the ‘emotional voice of a divided nation’, for the NZZ she is the ‘foremost feminine voice of Turkish contemporary literature’. In The Independent the author was called ‘the voice of Turkish literature’, and in The New York Times she is known as the ‘most prominent feminist literary voice of Turkey’.”